Straight from the dog’s mouth | Article

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(Editor’s Note: The Fort Huachuca Public Affairs Office went contained in the 483rd Military Working Dog Detachment for a special interview with one in all its recently deployed members.)









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Spc. Shawn A. Buie, a 31K military working dog handler with the 483rd Military Working Dog Detachment leads Nina, a Belgian Malinois drug detector, through a training session at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew C. Green)

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Straight from the dog's mouth








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Spc. Shawn A. Buie, a 31K military working dog handler with the 483rd Military Working Dog Detachment leads Nina, a Belgian Malinois drug detector, through a training session at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew C. Green)

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Straight from the dog's mouth








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Spc. Shawn A. Buie, a 31K military working dog handler with the 483rd Military Working Dog Detachment rewards Nina, a Belgian Malinois drug detector, after a terrific training session at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew C. Green)

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FORT HUACHUCA, Ariz. – It’s an early morning wakeup call for training today followed by ensuring the sleeping quarters were cleaned and inspected before heading out to the sphere.

“I’m a five-year-old Belgian Malinois who focuses on drug detection,” said Nina.

Nina, a military working dog, went through 4 months of coaching at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas.

“Some dogs take just a little longer, but since I’m super smart I didn’t must wait to return protect the community here.

“I actually have been working with my dad, or because the Soldiers call him, Spc. Shawn A.  Buie, for the past yr.”

Nina and Buie recently returned from a five-month deployment to Kuwait.

“We spent most of our time searching bags for customs to make sure that nobody was attempting to bring drugs back to the US,” Nina explained. “Dad said that if we had stayed for nine months I might have sniffed over 10,000 bags your entire time we were there.

“I spent a bunch of time with my dad in Kuwait, I slept on a bed with him, and we might go to the Exchange together. My fondest memory of Kuwait was on a regular basis I spent with my dad; I rarely left his side.”

Nina and Buie normally work 4 days every week training on the skill sets Nina learned during her initial military education.

“After we work, he tries to cover the drugs, but I all the time find them even when it takes me just a little longer cause dad is getting really good at hiding them from me,” Nina bragged.

“Sometimes once I find some drugs my dad gives me my favorite snack – pepperoni, but I all the time get my favorite toy – the Kong.

“Through the training today I discovered five drugs all hidden in buildings or within the dirt. Dad shows me where to smell for the drugs and I find them.

“Today we began in lower Garden Canyon where training samples of marijuana and cocaine were hidden throughout 1 / 4 mile of buildings and open terrain.

“After I found the primary stash of medicine, dad gave me my Kong. I got so excited, and we even played just a little tug of war. Then it was back to work, because I still had more drugs to search out.

“When the entire drugs were found, I used to be really drained, so dad gave me a break and a few water. Dad even let me keep my Kong, because he was so pleased with me for locating all of the drugs.

“We make an awesome team together. The bond we have now is unmatched, and nobody can ever replace my dad,” Nina said as she leaned in closer to Buie.

Nina and Buie spent the rest of the day with the remaining of the military working dogs conducting more drug detection training before heading back to the kennels for the evening.

“Life within the kennels isn’t bad because I’m around all my friends daily,” Nina explained. “I’m one in all 4 Belgian Malinois and 4 German Shepherds on the kennels. Regardless that I specialise in narcotic detection, five of my other friends are really good at sniffing out explosives, which is just a little too scary for me.

“Sometimes we get excited and really loud when our parents come feed us or take us out to play. Our parents have taught us that trying to find drugs is a game for us, and we’re really good at that game. Dad knows exactly the right way to keep my head in the sport, even when someone has some really delicious snacks laying around,” Nina said licking her lips.

“My dad tells me on a regular basis that I’m too hyper, but it surely’s a extremely good thing if I actually have to bite someone,” she explained. “I used to be trained from a young age to only bite when dad gives me our secret command or when individuals are too aggressive.”

Military working dogs also conduct local security checks, bomb sweeps and more to maintain the Fort Huachuca community protected.

“After we do what the Soldiers call health and welfare check…all I do is go in and poke my nose around to be sure the young Soldiers are being protected and don’t have anything they shouldn’t, but sometimes I get distracted by the pizza they omit since it has pepperoni.

“I actually have only done 4 of those health and welfare checks with my dad, and I can confidently say, ‘no pizza has been eaten during those checks.’ Nevertheless, I shouldn’t be held liable if I do eat among the delicious snacks which are not noted for me.

“Dad says I’m like controlled chaos,” Nina said. “When it’s time to work my nose is in the sport, but when work is over I’m a ball of energy that loves zoomies and getting belly scratches.

“I like being a military working dog within the 483rd Military Working Dog Detachment here.”

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Fort Huachuca is home to the U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence, the U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command (NETCOM)/ninth Army Signal Command and greater than 48 supported tenants representing a various, multiservice population. Our unique environment encompasses 946 square miles of restricted airspace and a pair of,500 square miles of protected electronic ranges, key components to the national defense mission.

Positioned in Cochise County, in southeast Arizona, about 15 miles north of the border with Mexico, Fort Huachuca is an Army installation with a wealthy frontier history. Established in 1877, the Fort was declared a national landmark in 1976.

We’re the Army’s Home. Learn more at https://home.army.mil/huachuca/.

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